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By: Anonymous: Barry Mead () on Friday, December 25 2009 @ 10:04 PM PST (Read 4883 times)  
Anonymous: Barry Mead

I have used the AVR Studio for a couple of years now, and develop code for the Atmel processors in that environment frequently. Does the Arduino IDE provide any type of source level debugging capability?

If not, is there a simple way to convert an Arduino PDE file into a standalone C file, or batch of C files that are compatible with the AVR Studio environment so that source level debugging could be enabled?

Can one interrogate individual port bits, and CPU registers within the Arduino IDE as can be done in AVR Studio?






       
   
By: Windell (offline) on Saturday, December 26 2009 @ 12:20 AM PST  
Windell

The Arduino IDE does not provide any debugging capability. It's a simplified IDE that's cross platform, open-source, and *very* popular, and we've picked it for those reasons. In fairness, I don't miss debugging capability when I use it, but you're welcome to use whatever setup you like.

The Arduino environment includes a "standalone" makefile that can be used to compile the .pde file with the correct libraries. You can find it within the Arduino folder (or within the Arduino application package on a Mac) at hardware/cores/arduino/Makefile. I know that you can use this with straight avr-gcc (as installed by win-avr, or CrossPack on the Mac), but I have not tried to do it directly within AVR studio-- which does not support C++ out of the box. For additional details, you may want to do some research on the Arduino forums and at AVRfreaks.

See also:
http://www.avrfreaks.net/index.php?name=PNphpBB2&file=viewtopic&t=59453

Rather than trying to deal with C++ and AVRstudio, you may want to just take our .pde file (which only uses straight C) and fill in the missing few functions (as well as the millisecond timer function) from the libraries that we're using.


Windell H. Oskay
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By: Anonymous: Barry Mead () on Saturday, December 26 2009 @ 01:21 AM PST  
Anonymous: Barry Mead

I have lots of computers at my house with almost any environment possible (Linux, Windows, Mac). I noticed that you mentioned the Mac in your last posting. Is Arduino programming easier to set up and use on the Mac? It wouldn't surprise me if it were, because most things are easier to set up on a Mac. My iMac is my newest computer, so I am just starting to get things set up on it. What do you like to use?






       
   
By: Windell (offline) on Saturday, December 26 2009 @ 02:06 AM PST  
Windell

Yes, Arduino on a Mac is the easiest setup, and it's what we use. All you need is the main program and the USB-TTL cable.


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By: Anonymous: Barry Mead () on Saturday, December 26 2009 @ 04:08 AM PST  
Anonymous: Barry Mead

Thanks the Mac was very easy to set up. So far I have all of the Arduino tools working in both the Windows and Mac environments. My two linux computers are using some older libraries, and the ordeal of bringing the Java up to date is proving to be more trouble than I bargained for. So I guess I will use the Mac, for all Arduino stuff, since I don't have to reboot as I do to load windows.





       
   



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