Forum Index > Projects > Clock Kits
 What are the empty spots on board for?
 |  Printable Version
By: fdastoor (offline) on Sunday, August 15 2010 @ 02:09 PM PDT (Read 8249 times)  
fdastoor

I noticed 2 areas on the boards that has place for components. What are these for? Additional options?


Forum Apprentice
Apprentice

Status: offline

Registered: 08/01/10
Posts: 10

Profile Email    
   
By: Windell (offline) on Sunday, August 15 2010 @ 04:37 PM PDT  
Windell

Which two areas? Please clarify.


Windell H. Oskay
drwho(at)evilmadscientist.com
http://www.evilmadscientist.com/

Forum Evil Scientist
Evil Scientist

Status: offline

Registered: 06/15/06
Posts: 1932
Sunnyvale, CA

Profile Email Website  
   
By: fdastoor (offline) on Tuesday, August 17 2010 @ 09:54 AM PDT  
fdastoor

On the Blue PCB in the R lower corner and the Left upper corner.


Forum Apprentice
Apprentice

Status: offline

Registered: 08/01/10
Posts: 10

Profile Email    
   
By: Windell (offline) on Tuesday, August 17 2010 @ 10:06 AM PDT  
Windell

Ah-- I think that I see what you mean.

The lower right corner has a location to install a voltage regulator and its two support capacitors. The kits include a 5 V power supply. However, if you did not have a 5 V power supply, you could use a 6.5 - 12V power supply, in combination with the regulator. Normally we use a wire jumper to short circuit across the regulator, under the assumption that the input power is 5 V.

The upper left corner has two locations, R12 and R13, to install optional pull-up resistors for I2C. These are normally not needed because the internal pull-up resistors on the AVR are usually sufficient for most purposes.


Windell H. Oskay
drwho(at)evilmadscientist.com
http://www.evilmadscientist.com/

Forum Evil Scientist
Evil Scientist

Status: offline

Registered: 06/15/06
Posts: 1932
Sunnyvale, CA

Profile Email Website  
   
By: Anonymous: Ray () on Saturday, January 15 2011 @ 10:39 AM PST  
Anonymous: Ray

How about offering a "hackers kit" with optional nick knacks? I personally would like a DIP socket for the atmega, a CDS for dimmer mods, a piezo buzzer for alarm mods, all the parts need for the voltage regulator (http://evilmadscience.com/partsmenu/181-5vreg), 9v power supply to accompany the prior, and the option to include an atmega328 (for us sloppy beginners with bloated code Laughing Out Loud ).





       
   
By: Windell (offline) on Saturday, January 15 2011 @ 11:56 AM PST  
Windell

How about offering a "hackers kit" with optional nick knacks? I personally would like a DIP socket for the atmega, a CDS for dimmer mods, a piezo buzzer for alarm mods, all the parts need for the voltage regulator (http://evilmadscience.com/partsmenu/181-5vreg), 9v power supply to accompany the prior, and the option to include an atmega328 (for us sloppy beginners with bloated code ).


We do offer most of those parts at our store already. We don't use CDS cells, but do have phototransistors, low-power buzzers (we prefer magnetic, not peizo), regulators, power supplies, sockets, and (when they're freaking available) '328 chips. Some are stock items, and the rest are available by special request-- our store has a happy niche, filling lots of custom orders for various assortments of hacking parts. Big Grin


Windell H. Oskay
drwho(at)evilmadscientist.com
http://www.evilmadscientist.com/

Forum Evil Scientist
Evil Scientist

Status: offline

Registered: 06/15/06
Posts: 1932
Sunnyvale, CA

Profile Email Website  
   
By: revnull (offline) on Saturday, January 15 2011 @ 12:33 PM PST  
revnull

Firstly, awesome kit!

I've seen that they are offered separately, but you know we consumers love bundles. I was thinking instead of buying "extra" parts, there would be an option to substitute. For instance, I would pay a few $$ more for the atmega328. I would also opt for the 9v PSU with regulator instead of the 5v PSU with jumper. If purchase separately, the regulator kit ($2) and 9v PSU ($7) are cheaper than the 5v PSU ($12). As for the CDS and buzzer, just tossing out ideas. I'm also thinking of adding a DC barrel jack to the back of the case using the alternate power points on the main PCB. That way I can plug and unplug the power without opening the case. Having a laser cut hole on the back plate would be nice *wink*. Big Grin


Forum Apprentice
Apprentice

Status: offline

Registered: 01/15/11
Posts: 5
Morgan Hill, Ca

Profile      
   
By: Windell (offline) on Saturday, January 15 2011 @ 09:30 PM PST  
Windell

> I've seen that they are offered separately, but you know we consumers love bundles.
> For instance, I would pay a few $$ more for the atmega328.

The standard configurations are ones that are suitable for most people. Offering too many choices is usually *not* a good idea. If we offered everyone the option of upgrading to a '328, then everyone purchasing the kit would need to look up what the two chips are, and evaluate whether or not they needed it. (The overall result would be fewer kits shipped.) This hasn't exactly been a popular request, either.

Also, there's currently a universal shortage of '328s right now, so it's not something that we could offer even if we wanted to. (Even the Arduino team had to release an alternate version because they can't get them.)

>I would also opt for the 9v PSU with regulator instead of the 5v PSU with jumper.

Can I ask why? There's absolutely no advantage to it. Using the regulator just means that 4/9 of the power supply's output would be dissipated as heat. There's nothing in the clock design that would benefit from having 9 V there.

> If purchase separately, the regulator kit ($2) and 9v PSU ($7) are cheaper than the 5v PSU ($12).

Our store does have a fancy "energy star" 5 V power supply for $12, but the regular 5 V power supply is only $5. It may not be as efficient as the energy star supply, but it's *way* more efficient than using a 9 V with a regulator.

> I'm also thinking of adding a DC barrel jack to the back of the case using the alternate power points on the main PCB. Having a laser cut hole on the back plate would be nice *wink*.

Good idea on bolting the jack directly to the case. We might have used a vertical jack that you could reach through the case, except that we wanted to keep the clock design reversible. If you use the rear-projection option, the back is now the front-- and you wouldn't want the power jack sticking out of the front.






Windell H. Oskay
drwho(at)evilmadscientist.com
http://www.evilmadscientist.com/

Forum Evil Scientist
Evil Scientist

Status: offline

Registered: 06/15/06
Posts: 1932
Sunnyvale, CA

Profile Email Website  
   
By: revnull (offline) on Sunday, January 16 2011 @ 01:33 AM PST  
revnull

The standard configurations are ones that are suitable for most people. Offering too many choices is usually *not* a good idea. If we offered everyone the option of upgrading to a '328, then everyone purchasing the kit would need to look up what the two chips are, and evaluate whether or not they needed it. (The overall result would be fewer kits shipped.) This hasn't exactly been a popular request, either.

Also, there's currently a universal shortage of '328s right now, so it's not something that we could offer even if we wanted to. (Even the Arduino team had to release an alternate version because they can't get them.)


I completely understand the potential confusion. My suggestion of creating an "evil scary hacker's bundle of doom" would steer most standard buyers toward the regular kit. A la arduino basic, intermediate, and advanced bundles offered from other sites (not comparing with you, just for illustration). I don't believe it would result in fewer kits sold but instead attract more adventurous hardware hackers to do really neat things with this great kit (I would buy one Big Grin).

Can I ask why? There's absolutely no advantage to it. Using the regulator just means that 4/9 of the power supply's output would be dissipated as heat. There's nothing in the clock design that would benefit from having 9 V there.


To be honest, this is mostly because I'm lazy. If my 5v PSU drops dead, I have plenty of 9-12v unregulated wall warts laying around that I could use instead. I can also use battery packs for mobility. Also, I figure at some point you added it to the PCB, so why not use it? Efficiency be damned! Twisted Evil

Good idea on bolting the jack directly to the case. We might have used a vertical jack that you could reach through the case, except that we wanted to keep the clock design reversible. If you use the rear-projection option, the back is now the front-- and you wouldn't want the power jack sticking out of the front.


For the DC jack I was going to use a 3-pin header (removing the center pin) and a old motherboard header cable (3-wide) that way I can solder the header to either the front or the back of the PCB depending on the application. I may do the same with the 3 switches. Either find replacement switches that go straight up with enough length to protrude through pre-drilled holes in the back plate of the case or maybe some small momentary switches with retention screws like the DC jack.


Forum Apprentice
Apprentice

Status: offline

Registered: 01/15/11
Posts: 5
Morgan Hill, Ca

Profile      
   
By: revnull (offline) on Thursday, January 20 2011 @ 08:49 PM PST  
revnull

Before I begin building my bulbdial clock, I thought I would make a few wholes in the back plate for the 3 buttons and DC power jack. Does anyone have any advice on drilling acrylic? Last time I tried (in high school) I had access to a drill press. Now all I have is an 18v Dewalt and a shaky hand. Big Grin

image

I used the standoffs and screws to center the main PCB on the back plate and eyed the centers of the switches. The cross mark to the right is for the power jack. Maybe before I drill, I'll measure for a bit more accuracy.


Forum Apprentice
Apprentice

Status: offline

Registered: 01/15/11
Posts: 5
Morgan Hill, Ca

Profile      
   
By: Windell (offline) on Thursday, January 20 2011 @ 11:30 PM PST  
Windell

Drilling acrylic is tricky. There's some good advice here: http://www.bertram31.com/proj/tips/drill_acrylic.htm


Windell H. Oskay
drwho(at)evilmadscientist.com
http://www.evilmadscientist.com/

Forum Evil Scientist
Evil Scientist

Status: offline

Registered: 06/15/06
Posts: 1932
Sunnyvale, CA

Profile Email Website  
   



 All times are PDT. The time is now 07:03 AM.
Normal Topic Normal Topic
Locked Topic Locked Topic
Sticky Topic Sticky Topic
New Post New Post
Sticky Topic W/ New Post Sticky Topic W/ New Post
Locked Topic W/ New Post Locked Topic W/ New Post
View Anonymous Posts 
Able to Post 
Filtered HTML Allowed 
Censored Content 

Evil Mad Scientist Forum Archives — Read only!

Please visit our new forums for new discussions.


DIY Hardware for Electronic Art


The Original Egg-Bot Kit


Octolively
Interactive LED kits


Meggy Jr RGB
LED matrix game
development kit.


Business-card sized
AVR target boards


Peggy 2
LED Pegboard kits

My Account






Lost your password?