Forum Index > Projects > Interactive LED projects
 Interfacing with Arduino
 |  Printable Version
By: Anonymous: Matt () on Friday, November 11 2011 @ 03:36 PM PST (Read 3359 times)  
Anonymous: Matt

Hi,

I am curious if anyone has any experience with interfacing with an Arduino. The only information we need to gather is when each Led is activated. Just curious if anyone else has done this yet, and what thoughts they may have for the process.

Thanks,

Matt





       
   
By: karlgg (offline) on Friday, November 11 2011 @ 04:42 PM PST  
karlgg

That's more than a little vague. Can you describe a little more of what you're trying (or want) to do?


I think I am, therefore I am... I think
Forum Mad Scientist
Mad Scientist

Status: offline

Registered: 01/25/09
Posts: 81

Profile Email    
   
By: Windell (offline) on Friday, November 11 2011 @ 05:01 PM PST  
Windell

If you'd like to interface with Arduino, in any sense, the Octolively might be a better choice. The original Interactive LED Panels are fully analog; there's a continuous scale of activation from none to maximum.


Windell H. Oskay
drwho(at)evilmadscientist.com
http://www.evilmadscientist.com/

Forum Evil Scientist
Evil Scientist

Status: offline

Registered: 06/15/06
Posts: 1932
Sunnyvale, CA

Profile Email Website  
   
By: Anonymous: Matt () on Friday, November 11 2011 @ 05:23 PM PST  
Anonymous: Matt

I am sorry if I was not clear. I guess I don't know the full range of what this forum covers. I made the assumption it was for the Octolively. Please forgive me for not being clear.

We want to try and use it as an interface device for controlling a map on another screen, is the general gist of what we want to do. For example when you swipe right over two Octolively's the Arduino would then take that data and let the device is controlling know we are telling it to move right. So, with that being known now, how would you suggest we interface with the Arduino?

I can write software, but interfacing with external hardware is a new thing for me. So is there someway we can take the serial interface pins for connecting multiple devices into analog pins of the Arduino, or some way to interface with the programming terminal?

I appreciate the quick response, and willingness to give us some input.

Thanks,
Matt





       
   
By: squall_line (offline) on Saturday, November 12 2011 @ 06:10 AM PST  
squall_line

Well, since the Octolively boards are full open-source, you could just re-program them to watch for those specific conditions and then send a command over their lines to the Arduino telling it which direction you want to go.

I don't know how much precision you need, so the Octolively board in its stock form may not be the best choice for interpreting direction of hand gestures in the air. After all, depending on the size of the hand, it could easily cover 4 or more sensors at once, which would make the programming and monitoring of directionality rather hard to decipher.


Forum Mad Scientist
Mad Scientist

Status: offline

Registered: 04/13/10
Posts: 96
Iowa, USA

Profile Email    
   
By: Windell (offline) on Saturday, November 12 2011 @ 12:00 PM PST  
Windell

So is there someway we can take the serial interface pins for connecting multiple devices into analog pins of the Arduino, or some way to interface with the programming terminal?

Yes, the serial interface pins could be set up as a "software serial" port to communicate from one Octolively board to your Arduino, giving whatever data you care to read out. It might be easiest to extract the "raw" signal levels to the Arduino and process "swiping" there, as the Octolively has its hands full with performing its usual duties.


Windell H. Oskay
drwho(at)evilmadscientist.com
http://www.evilmadscientist.com/

Forum Evil Scientist
Evil Scientist

Status: offline

Registered: 06/15/06
Posts: 1932
Sunnyvale, CA

Profile Email Website  
   
By: Anonymous: Matt () on Saturday, November 12 2011 @ 01:14 PM PST  
Anonymous: Matt

Windell,

Are you suggesting we hardwire each LED's signal to analog pins on the Arduino and just have it monitor the changes?

I am no hardware expert by any means. In fact, this was my first ever kit experience, and I must say it was a blast to build. So, I appreciate your input!

I do have some other friends to pull from for actually getting something implemented. I am good friends with a few of the Make Magazine Interns, and one of them wants to be involved with the project. So, ill try not to be a leech of your time for what to do next. I just wanted to see how you would recommend we go about it.

squall_line: We ran some tests yesterday, and with the Octolively's sensitivity set to level 2 it actually seemed to do the trick just fine for our gestures we are thinking of using.

When we make some progress we will share photos and such with you guys. Its a neat little device.

Matt





       
   
By: Ugi (offline) on Saturday, November 12 2011 @ 02:29 PM PST  
Ugi

I can't at all speak for Windell but I think he was simply saying that you could transfer the signals generated at each sensor directly across to your arduino for processing. I guess that the Octo' generates a signal on a particular scale each time each sensor is polled. I haven't looked at the code but it's not unlikely that it takes a "passive" background signal and an "actve" signal with the LED lit for each sensor for each time point. That's potentially 16 signals for each time point.

To work out what movement is happening you would need to decide which of these signals were rising and which were falling etc and relate that to movement above the board. That's potentially quite a lot of thinking that the octo' might not have the capacity to do 'cos it's busy with the next round of data collection.

As I understood it, the suggestion was to send the raw sensor readings out through the software serial port each time. That doesn't mean that you wire the sensors to the Ardu'. Rather that the Octo' does the data collection and simply sends a few numbers out over serial each time. The comparison and interpretation would then be done on the ardu'.

Sounds like a great project.


Forum Apprentice
Apprentice

Status: offline

Registered: 10/06/11
Posts: 9

Profile Email    
   
By: Windell (offline) on Saturday, November 12 2011 @ 03:21 PM PST  
Windell

Are you suggesting we hardwire each LED's signal to analog pins on the Arduino and just have it monitor the changes?

Nope. The Octolively uses software to turn the IR LED and IR phototransistor pair into a most useful little proximity sensor. Find this part of the software, and send the information out over a software serial port. Pin PB0 is available as an output (TX) and pin PB1 is available as an input (RX) for communication.

I am no hardware expert by any means. In fact, this was my first ever kit experience, and I must say it was a blast to build.

Awesome!

When we make some progress we will share photos and such with you guys.

Great- we'd love to see it.


Windell H. Oskay
drwho(at)evilmadscientist.com
http://www.evilmadscientist.com/

Forum Evil Scientist
Evil Scientist

Status: offline

Registered: 06/15/06
Posts: 1932
Sunnyvale, CA

Profile Email Website  
   
By: Windell (offline) on Saturday, November 12 2011 @ 03:23 PM PST  
Windell

Quote by: Ugi


To work out what movement is happening you would need to decide which of these signals were rising and which were falling etc and relate that to movement above the board. That's potentially quite a lot of thinking that the octo' might not have the capacity to do 'cos it's busy with the next round of data collection.

As I understood it, the suggestion was to send the raw sensor readings out through the software serial port each time. That doesn't mean that you wire the sensors to the Ardu'. Rather that the Octo' does the data collection and simply sends a few numbers out over serial each time. The comparison and interpretation would then be done on the ardu'.

Sounds like a great project.

Yes, on all sounds. Big Grin


Windell H. Oskay
drwho(at)evilmadscientist.com
http://www.evilmadscientist.com/

Forum Evil Scientist
Evil Scientist

Status: offline

Registered: 06/15/06
Posts: 1932
Sunnyvale, CA

Profile Email Website  
   
By: Anonymous: Matt () on Saturday, November 12 2011 @ 09:58 PM PST  
Anonymous: Matt

Windell and Ugi,

Thanks a bunch.

Do you think it would be possible to steal say Pins PB2, PB3, or PB4 and rig them for I/O or would it be to much? My reasoning is because we want to be able to link it to one other board, probably on the 4 LED side top or bottom. I know that PB1-4 right now are all set to listen to the other boards attached, and PB0 blasts out to all 4 what it is doing.

So is it possible to still maintain a small network and take away two pins for serial? or would it be to much for the little guy?

Matt





       
   
By: Windell (offline) on Sunday, November 13 2011 @ 02:32 PM PST  
Windell

Do you think it would be possible to steal say Pins PB2, PB3, or PB4 and rig them for I/O or would it be to much? My reasoning is because we want to be able to link it to one other board, probably on the 4 LED side top or bottom. I know that PB1-4 right now are all set to listen to the other boards attached, and PB0 blasts out to all 4 what it is doing.

To use these pins for I/O, you'll more or less need to disable the inter-board pulse.

The SPI interface is not normally used on the Octolively, except during programming. You might consider hooking PB5/6/7 up as your serial or I/O pins.


Windell H. Oskay
drwho(at)evilmadscientist.com
http://www.evilmadscientist.com/

Forum Evil Scientist
Evil Scientist

Status: offline

Registered: 06/15/06
Posts: 1932
Sunnyvale, CA

Profile Email Website  
   
By: Anonymous: Osc () on Monday, January 09 2012 @ 02:12 PM PST  
Anonymous: Osc

Looking at a similar scenario and thinking about an array of (32) Octolively panels such that all of the signals (representing 256 LEDs) can be aggregated into a single serial signal.

In our use case, we only need to detect the initial trigger (ie LED ON state).

I am picturing something simple, similar to DMX protocol, with a fixed 8 byte chain passed sequentially to each Octolively board, where each LED state is represented by 1 bit.

Wendell: Can you comment on the feasibility? Can (32) software serial ports be daisy chained? Think there is enough spare CPU for the Octolively boards to support that type of aggregation?

tia!





       
   
By: Windell (offline) on Monday, January 09 2012 @ 06:09 PM PST  
Windell

Yes, it is possible,but the question is what the data rate would be like-- would it be fast enough to "feel" right?


Windell H. Oskay
drwho(at)evilmadscientist.com
http://www.evilmadscientist.com/

Forum Evil Scientist
Evil Scientist

Status: offline

Registered: 06/15/06
Posts: 1932
Sunnyvale, CA

Profile Email Website  
   
By: Anonymous: Levy () on Thursday, February 16 2012 @ 07:14 PM PST  
Anonymous: Levy

I'm also having some problem regarding on this and I really need to have some solution on it. I'm new on this Arduino and after reading this I think I can work on it now. Thanks for the big help guys.






       
   



 All times are PDT. The time is now 01:04 PM.
Normal Topic Normal Topic
Locked Topic Locked Topic
Sticky Topic Sticky Topic
New Post New Post
Sticky Topic W/ New Post Sticky Topic W/ New Post
Locked Topic W/ New Post Locked Topic W/ New Post
View Anonymous Posts 
Able to Post 
Filtered HTML Allowed 
Censored Content 

Evil Mad Scientist Forum Archives — Read only!

Please visit our new forums for new discussions.


DIY Hardware for Electronic Art


The Original Egg-Bot Kit


Octolively
Interactive LED kits


Meggy Jr RGB
LED matrix game
development kit.


Business-card sized
AVR target boards


Peggy 2
LED Pegboard kits

My Account






Lost your password?